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  1. page Plot Synopsis of Jane Eyre edited Jane Eyre Plot Synopsis {jane eyre 1.jpg} Introduction Introduction to Jane ... Mrs. Reed, an…
    Jane Eyre Plot Synopsis
    {jane eyre 1.jpg} IntroductionIntroduction to Jane
    ...
    Mrs. Reed, and her three horrible children, the only relativerelatives that she
    Mrs. Reed decides on a school to send Jane to, and the man running the school, Mr. Brocklehurst, arrives at the Reed household, and he questions Jane on religion, and he acts disgusted about Jane’s uninterested attitude about it. Mrs. Reed mentions that Jane is a liar and a terrible child, and Mr. Brocklehurst makes sure to tell the teachers at the school.
    {jane eyre 1.jpg}
    After a few months of waiting, Jane is sent away. A carriage is sent for Jane at the household and after a long cold ride through many small towns, she arrives at the Lowood School for girls. She is surprised to learn that the school only has eighty girls, and she soon discovers that the school was made for orphans and is for the purpose of charity.
    Jane's first few months at the school went by as she learned how to behave accordingly. During this time, she befriends Helen Burns, a respectable girl who always seems to be undergoing some sort of punishment. Helen is an important character because she teaches Jane about religion, and how one should act in regard to what awaits them after death. Helen, constantly being punished, brings out curiosity from Jane as to why she never retaliates to unfair punishment. Helen only said that in a way, she did deserve it, and that the strict teacher, Ms. Scatcherd, only wishes to fix faults in her. At this, Jane is astonished, and {lowood.jpg} that she would most definitely retaliate if such acts were made against her. Helen clams her and convinces her that the is much more to life than such small details.
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    4:55 pm

Monday, October 14

  1. page Jane Eyre and the Victorian Woman edited ... Victorian Women Dress of the Victorian Women In the time of the 19th century when Jane E…
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    Victorian Women
    Dress of the Victorian Women
    In the time of the 19th century when Jane Eyre was experiencing the life of a traditional women society had very specific ideas of how women should look and dress. Most women wore draped and high-wasted gowns with a high rise tight bust and long bottom going to at least ankle length. Women such as Jane wore plain dresses to do work and because they were poor. Jane knew she was plain women and nothing like Rochester’s other suitor Blanche Ingram. Women such as Blanche would wear very elaborate and brilliantly made dresses because she was a wealthy socialite. All women’s clothing rich or poor had essentially one style and they had few other options but long dresses. Corsets and other frame work under dresses were also increasingly popular throughout Europe to give women the image of a small narrow waist and large hips and bodes. The way women would dress was based on a long tradition of modest women to cover to their wrists and ankles. Women would push this boundary continually by progressively tighter tops and a more exposed chest.
    {dress 2.jpg}
    Marriage and Divorce
    {marry 2.jpg}
    Jane
    Jane Eyre and
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    little education consisting of only basic reading anand etiquette. They were grownraised to be
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    family wealth. This is why Jane and Rochester have a unique and intuitive relationship because their love
    {marry 1.jpg} families would have some paid help for education and cleaning but it was the wife who would oversee the household.
    Men would
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    so many women would have
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    adultery. Once marriedmarried, all of a women’s belongings,
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    If she choosechose to divorce
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    immediate custody. overwhelms traditional ways of life. When a womenwoman would marry
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    children. Richer
    Education
    Many women who had the chance to go to school were only taught stuff about family life. Such as sewing and poetry. They did not learn
    married couples might hire a lot about other subjects because the man would be the one with the highest income job and the women stayed around the house with the children. Lots of schools that were for women we very poor and the conditions were harsh. Most schools were boarding schools like Lowood School were Jane stayed. The locals school that women wentgoverness and/or nurse to where mostly for basic teachings. Some women that did get a chance for university were often some of the most successful womentake care of their time. There was two types that women studied from. The liberal humanists had a broad range of education but the information was less specific. The second type was the ulitarians which has a narrower range of education but was more specific.
    {sc.jpg} Stereotypes
    children for them.
    Stereotypes
    and Etiquette
    Victorian women were definitely viewed more as objects than as women. They were also viewed as prospects and things to boost a man’s social standing or public perception. Women didn’t have jobs because men didn’t want to see women in a place resembling leadership. The education of women reflected that. Most women probably looked and acted like dolls. The sources that I used reinforced this opinion by saying that women were placid, shallow, unintelligent, soft beings. Some things that I saw were crazy, like the rule that women couldn’t lift heavy things in the presence of men, or make sharp motions. Looking at all of these odd, almost extreme mannerisms that were expected out of women makes me realize that Jane eyre really was a revolutionary. At first when I read the book, I thought that is how a regular woman would act. Now that I have read about the proper etiquette for Victorian women, I understand that
    {rt.png}
    she was a radical feminist.
    {otttt.png}{sc.jpg} {otttt.png}
    Employment
    The working-class women were the ones who had to provide for their family. Some of these women worked in mines underground until the ‘mines and curriers act’ in 1842. Agricultural jobs did not pay well so these women usually looked for industrial employment. Some could find jobs working in an assembly line or working for industrial laundry services. Women also became street vendors, some were ‘French polishers’. Women could not expect to be paid the same wages as men for doing the same job. Pregnant women would work up to the day they gave birth and came back when physically able. Middle-class women were able to find salaried jobs as salesgirls, cashiers, typists, and secretaries because they started to get more education. Working as a maid or cook was common. Employment from women in solidly middle-class families was strictly school teacher or governess. As telephones became more popular they telephone operators. Back then there were only three medical jobs for women; nursing, midwifery, and doctoring. Englishmen would not have women surgeons or physicians.

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    9:00 pm
  2. page Characters edited ... Eliza Reed: Jane's cousin, Mrs. Reed’s daughter, and Georgiana's sister. The more spiritual of…
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    Eliza Reed: Jane's cousin, Mrs. Reed’s daughter, and Georgiana's sister. The more spiritual of the two Rivers sisters, she devotes herself to the church then she becomes the Mother Superior in a convent in France.
    John Reed: The only son to Mrs. Reed, and the brother of Georgiana and Eliza. He is the meanest of them all. He beat Jane to no end during their childhood both physically and mentally. He took on the male dominate role in the Reed household making him superior and giving him the 'right' to abuse Jane. He drank a lot and gambled. When his mother refuses to pay his debt, he commits suicide.
    -
    Helen
    Helen Burns: Jane’s
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    to live for.for and quite a short life at that. She is
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    the many girls to die at Lowoodthe school of consumption.
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    Thornfield Hall, and visits her
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    funds his eccentric lifestyle with
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    as Miss Temple. SheTemple, she is the
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    teachers at Lowood. SheLowood, she rarely showed
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    despised Helen specifically.specifically, subjecting her to public ridicule.
    Bertha Mason:
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    Rochester's old wife. Hewife, he married her
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    town Jamaica shewhen he was in his twenties. She once was
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    and beautiful womenwoman who went
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    is often drunkintoxicated and does
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    lock the doordoor, inadvertently letting Bertha
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    escape. Bertha mason roams the
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    mansion at night. Bertha startsnight, causing terrors such as starting the house
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    fire and jumpsjumping into the flamesflames, committing suicide.
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    Is the girlwoman who guards
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    locked up. She is often drunk and forgetsHer drinking causes her to lock the doorfall asleep and letsallow the estranged Bertha escape.Mason to escape and cause frights in hall. Ms. Fairfax
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    things the estrangedcrazy woman does.
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    care of her, although he lacks the patience to expand his relationship with her. Adele's
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    Mr. Rochester's mistressmistresses from his younger days, but he
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    Adele is his.his child.
    Celine Varens:
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    his money, but laterand later, he found her having a secondary affair, and she left
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    arrives at ThornfieldThornfield, she is
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    to communicate effectively with Adele.
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    is Bertha’s brother. He is alsobrother; Mr. Rochester’s brother in-law, and also his good friend.
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    his crazy sister Bertha.sister. Mr. Mason
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    already being married to his sister.married.
    Mr. Briggs:
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    attorney, when John Eyrehe passes Mr.
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    the inheritance that John left to Jane.her by her uncle.
    Blanche Ingram:
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    looks down uponon Jane Eyre
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    attitude towards her.people of lower social class. Miss Ingram
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    for his money,money and status, not for
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    brother St. John.John because spousal love was not present between them.
    Mary Rivers:
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    intelligent and independent thereforindependent, and therefore a role
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    Morton’s wealthiest inhabitant.inhabitant and primary benefactor. Rosamond gives
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    to adopt JaneJane, but because
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    cruel Aunt MissMrs. Reed he
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    that Jane was dead.had died at Lowood School. When he
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    deceased Mr. Reed.Reed throughout Gateshead, especially in the red room.
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    8:33 pm
  3. page Significant Passages edited ... Jane Eyre was raised with her aunt Mrs. Reed, because both of her parents had passed away. Mr.…
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    Jane Eyre was raised with her aunt Mrs. Reed, because both of her parents had passed away. Mr. Reed had passed away while Jane was at a young age and had asked Mrs. Reed to promise that she will raise Jane as one of her own. As Jane grew older, Mrs. Reed began to dislike her and would treat her very poorly. At the age of 10 Jane was sent to a school for girls because her aunt disliked her so much. Jane also did not like her aunt Mrs. Reed because of the way Jane was treated.
    “I saw he was going to marry her, for family, perhaps political reasons; because her rank and connections suited him; I felt he had not given her his love, and that her qualifications were ill adapted to win from him that treasure. This was the point – this was where the nerve was touched and teased – this was where the fever was sustained and fed she could not charm him.”
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    jealous and feeling in pain while watching Mr.
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    he treated her,her. Jane was feelingfelt like she can’tcouldn't be like
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    that she gothas nothing to be in the cast.offer. At the timetime, Mr. Rochester wantswanted to marry
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    for a whilewhile, which madmade Jane Eyre
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    with Mr. Rochester andRochester; he seems to
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    way. Jane wantswanted to take himRochester away and
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    Blanche how is a real relationship andfull of love is. Butis supposed to be. However, Jane could not do it becauseis full of so much sorrow, she was suffering looking in the scene and she kept silence as usual as she does.cant speak her mind. Jane was
    “I have for the first time found what I can truly love–I have found you. You are my sympathy–my better self–my good angel–I am bound to you with a strong attachment. I think you good, gifted, lovely: a fervent, a solemn passion is conceived in my heart; it leans to you, draws you to my center and spring of life, wrap my existence about you–and, kindling in pure, powerful flame, fuses you and me in one.”
    In this quote Mr. Rochester is explaining his love towards Jane. Mr. Rochester starts off by telling Jane that this is his first time he, has actually fallen deeply in love with somebody. Mr. Rochester tells Jane that she is his other half and that he feels a strong bond between the two of them. He thinks of her as a good, lovely, gifted, and a person that has convinced his heart. Mr. Rochester tells her that Jane is the center of his heart and ensures his life. He explains that soon he and Jane will be together as one.
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    6:32 pm
  4. page Plot Synopsis of Jane Eyre edited ... The wedding has now arrived, and Jane and Rochester are both on the podium, prepared to recite…
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    The wedding has now arrived, and Jane and Rochester are both on the podium, prepared to recite their vows. When it is asked if anyone objects to the marriage, one man steps forward. It is Mr. Mason. He claims that Mr. Rochester is already married. Mr. Rochester, as angry as he appears, does not object this accusation, but seeks to explain the real meaning to this claim. He explains that he was married to a Bertha Mason several years ago and that she had gone mad. to further prove his point he even takes Jane to see her. She is kept on the thrid floor and is cared for by Grace Poole. He explains that it was in fact Bertha who set the fire earlier in the story and that Grace Poole is paid to care for her. He also explains that the law requires a man to stay with his wife as long as they both live, and that even if she is mad, they are legally bound. to Jane, he explains that the marriage was arranged for her wealth by his father, not out of love. But Jane is still broken hearted and realizes that it would be unwise and shameful to marry an already married man. She spends little time in Thornfield after that, and one day runs away.
    Falling Action and Conclusion to Jane Eyre
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    with him. HeHe basically brings
    She finally decides that She loves Rochester no matter his situation, and that they were on a similar social level now that she was wealthy, and wants to find him. She leaves Saint John Rivers alone to find Rochester, and set off to Thornfield. She arrived there to find the mansion burned to ashes, as nothing but remains of what used to be Thornfield stood right before her eyes. She was deeply frightened, worried to say the least. All she came back for was Rochester and she didn’t even know if he was alive. She walked through the remains to look one last time for Rochester, but no luck. She found him in a small settlement in the woods, with his dog, Pilot. She approached him silently, as he felt her hands. Being blinded by the destructive fire, he could not tell who she was. He whispered, “Jane Eyre, Jane Eyre!” she was glad to be with him again. They were married, had two children and it was at the time, that Rochester had slowly gained his vision and could finally see his beautiful wife, and children.
    For further information on the Jane Eyre plot synopsis:
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    Jane Eyre Plot Synopsis (Shmoop)
    Jane Eyre Plot Synopsis (Youtube Video)

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    6:20 pm
  5. page Gender Roles in Jane Eyre & The Modern-Day Connection edited ... Jane Eyre is a woman in the Victorian era. She is expected to conform to different social rule…
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    Jane Eyre is a woman in the Victorian era. She is expected to conform to different social rules and face a lot gender discrimination. Jane's integrity is constantly tested as she goes throughout the novel, and she chooses not to sacrifice her dignity even though it would be
    {http://flavorwire.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/jane1.jpg}
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    class women usually weren't expected
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    doing other lady like things. In
    {http://0.tqn.com/d/movies/1/0/q/2/X/jane-eyre-michael-fassbender-photo.jpg}
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    travels without really letting anyone
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    were married it was almost like the woman wasbecame the man's
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    and also the littlehis french girl,daughter, Adele. This
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    Rochester, they could bothwould all be out
    {http://s3.amazonaws.com/photo.goodreads.com/misc/1297819169-1297819169_goodreads_misc.JPG}
    St. John is a serious and ambitious man. When he invites Jane to accompany him to India as his wife, she refuses because she doesn't love him as a husband, but as a brother. St. John insists that love isn't the reason that they need to be married, but that the reason they need to marry is because of society and the idea that Jane was meant to live the life of a missionary's wife. In this instance, St. John follows traditional marriage customs and sacrifices passion for principle. He shows his authority by not allowing Jane to accompany him to India unless they are married. If Jane was given the choice she would gladly accompany John as his sister instead of his wife, but St. John is stubborn and refuses to give in.
    Relationships to Gender Roles in the Modern Day in Comparison to Gender Roles in the Past
    Compared with the past century, Gender Roles have created a sort of turn of events. In the 1800's
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    the rise inof women in
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    1960's.
    {http://www.marriedtothesea.com/111409/teaching-kids-about-gender-roles.gif} ComparativelyComparatively, times
    between the 19th, 20th and 21st century have changed, but did that abundantly change, or was it a gradual change that is still engaging? There are many documents out there that explain how the workforce is increasing in women occupancy. Some even pertaining to future women occupancy such as Martha Barksdale’s article “Gender Gap” says, “By 2050, women will make up 47 percent of the workforce in the United States – up from 30 percent in 1950. But some experts are predicting that, at least in the short term, the number of women in the workforce may surpass the number of men.” (par. 2, Curiosity) She then proceeds to explain that since the economic recession in 2008, men’s jobs had disappeared, and when those jobs started to come back. Women took them.
    There are also arguments that in the past, men have treated women fairly and the stereotypical gender roles weren't real. As portrayed in the novel, Jane did show character of the average man (Strong, courageous, independent), and
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    6:16 pm

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